Holiday Safety for Pets

This holiday season is sure to be full of fun, family, and friends—make sure it’s the same way for your pet! Follow these safety tips from a Fort Bend veterinarian to ensure your pet stays comfortable and happy this holiday season.

Tree Hazards

Your holiday tree might be beautiful, but it can be hazardous to your pet if you’re not careful. Make sure to clean up any loose pine needles, as they can lacerate your pet’s esophagus or puncture the intestines if swallowed. Make sure the tree is sturdy—you don’t want your pet to tug on it and have it topple over on her. Don’t let her drink the stagnant tree water, as it most likely contains harmful bacteria. Also, tinsel can obstruct your pet’s digestive tract should she swallow it—put the tinsel high enough on the tree that your pet can’t reach it, or leave it off entirely.

Holiday Plants

Mistletoe, Holly, and Poinsettias are all poisonous to cats and dogs if enough of the plant is ingested. Make sure your pet’s can’t get to these holiday plants, or choose plastic or silk substitutes.

Dangerous Foods

Chocolate, grapes, raisins, onions, garlic, alcoholic drinks, caffeinated drinks—the list of dangerous foods and drinks goes on and on. Make sure all dangerous human foods are stored safely away, especially if your pet is the scrounging type. Also don’t go overboard on holiday table scraps. Contact your Fort Bend vet immediately if you think your pet has ingested something harmful.

Candles

Pets can burn themselves if they accidentally swish their tails through a lit candle. Also, they could accidently knock them over, harming themselves or potentially starting a fire. Keep lit candles safely secured.

Quiet Space

If guests are coming to your house for a holiday party, it might be a good idea to provide your pet with a quiet room to get away from the hustle and bustle. Some pets can get overwhelmed from the noise and amount of people. Set up a soft bed in a quiet back room, and lead your pet to it if she seems to be getting agitated.